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you tell us about these explosions? >> the pro-government media says that four explosions rocked the capital in damascus this morning. that area is very famous and very busy. many civilians killed, including children. the place where the explosion took place is usually a place where students stand on line and wait for the buses to take them back,. there are clashes between the government forces and the rebels. another adjacent neighborhood. these explosions look huge. buses, cars burned, people dead, children running away. the government accuses terrorist organizations of some of the activists saying that these explosions are saying they're justifying cracking down on the rebels. whoever is behind these explosions, they're very much coordinated attacks within the capital. >> thank you. the explosions happened just as the syrian national coalition met in cairo. there are reports suggesting that the opposition group is willing to negotiate with the government but only if the president is not part of the deal. we have the latest from these meetings in cairo. >> according to reuters,
they're telling us. so i think we have to have young people growing up understanding the risks, not focusing a single risk, but also understanding the benefits. and we have to have a society which supports the correct choices. the reality is that many teenagers today are engaging in sex, many without protection of any type. robert hatcher: what that often is, is opportunity and excitement joining together, and where people decide we're going to do it when actually it would be wiser that night not to do it until they had their contraception lined up. half the pregnancies in the united states today are unwanted or unplanned and a fourth of all pregnancies in the united states today end up in elective abortion. i think that's a big problem. four in ten young women have at least one unintended pregnancy before the age of 20. it wasn't really expected but then again, you now, i wasn't really using any protection so i knew it was going to happen eventually. i didn't think i could have kids, so i didn't think it was going to happen to me. yeah, i was confused. i didn't know what i was
round trip, blasting asteroids to do it safely. for us, viewing the game on a video screen, the asteroids spaceship appears to live on the surface of a two-dimensional plane. but actually, it could be "living" in other places, like the surface of a cylinder or even more exotic surfaces. that's where topology comes in, a branch of mathematics concerned with the study of spatial relationships that don't depend on measurement and is more concerned with concepts like "between" or "inside" and how things are connected. a topologist doesn't care that we bent the asteroid universe to better understand it. in fact, to a topologist nothing happened. the game's universe is still the same, it's just viewed from a different perspective. this looking at the world from a different perspective is at the core of topology, and today helps mathematicians get to the essence of many unusual puzzles. and it all started with seven bridges. in the early 18th century, one of the world's greatest mathematicians pondered a popular puzzle of his day. it was a puzzle about the town konigsberg, a town
that you've gone through that you'd like to share with us to start out? yeah, sure. >> it just leapt out of a book that i was reading - a spiritual experience. it's called, two against the sahara. >> i'll bet you just happen to have that ready to read. >> i happen to have it ready to read. >> isn't she amazing? well, fire away. i'd like to hear it. >> these two, the husband and wife, who were newlyweds are walking across the sahara desert, and they've gone - well, with camels - and they've gone 3,000 miles. and you can imagine the hardship and the joy and everything that goes along with that. anyway, "we moved on through sunset. a cold breeze chased away the last shreds of heat. the sun sank into a net of translucent clouds, like angry scratches on the sky's belly. in a moment, it appeared to balanced uncertainly on the edge of the dunes. i felt suddenly the tiny planet we were traveling on - an umbilicus bound us to it. it was not separate from us; we were as much manifestations of the earth as the rocks and the sand, the grass and the trees, the insects and the birds, the clouds and th
you find it? how could you not read the chapter and be astonished by that? i always used to think that the moon pulled harder on the oceans because it's closer, and the sun's so far away that the pull is a lot less. that's what i used to think, and then i get into my physics and boom, sometimes in physics you find things that are kind of like counterintuitive, don't they kind of say, hey, wait a minute, what's this, huh? and what's going on? it turns out that sun is far away, but honey, it is big. let me put it this way. you know the sun's hot and when you step from the shade into the sunlight, you can feel the heat of that sun, right? and you might say, wow, it feels-- i can feel the hotness because the sun has got such a high temperature, but you know what gang? i can bring you to welding shops wherein the welding, the torches of some of those flames are hotter than the surface of the sun, hotter, and you walk by that welding shop and you don't, whoa, go like that, but you step from the shade into the sunshine and whoa, you feel it. it's not that the sun has a high temperature.
, where we replay and reinterpret stories of america, as eli wallach recounts for us in "the western." (clint eastwood) he's another person adrift on the great west's landscape. that's always been part of the fun of the game is that lone figure on this huge landscape. and what's it like to be out there? it's another world out there. (clint eastwood) maybe he was just somebody who drifted along, happened by, and maybe he was asked for. it's that fantasy of a guy solving the problem himself. he isn't picking up and dialing 911 or other aid. through his own ingenuity, he's working out the situation. if he doesn't, he doesn't exist. you don't like our company? what's the matter with you? i'm speaking to you. (gunshots) (john sturges) everybody would like to be the fellow that says, i'll do it. i'm the one that can do it. everybody else tries, but turn to me, i can solve it for you. they want the magic touch, they want to be the legend. you liked good westerns and you may not have known why, but they were wonderful to watch. (budd boetticher) and it's very romantic. if movies could be a r
-in, both equally astute. one is brother mark, who used to be, i believe, a dentist or some kind of professional field, and he gave that up in order to go to this monastery, where he lives his life, and a life of meditation and prayer and connection with god. bishop thomas, on the other hand, is a major bishop in the coptic faith in egypt, but listen particularly, because we've had barbara's beautiful sahara - once again, we're getting too many synchronicities in this class. we have this book - from the library, folks; that's why you can't see the front on it - but we have this book about the sahara - we'll, we're going to the sahara; i forgot about that. yeah, we're going back to the sahara, and listen to what life would be like there. and so, if we could, let's go to st. macarius monastery in the deserts outside of cairo. >> the word monk , or monastery, monasticism, from mono - mono means single, one-say but one. here is all the monastic ones - mono, monk, monastic - they lived as hermits alone in the desert. now we live in a community together, so we built a wall all around t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7